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Italian Pastries


ZEPPOLE: St. Joseph’s Day Cream Puffs

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This is a shell-shaped filled pastry native to Campania.

Sfogliatella means “small, thin leaf/layer”, as the pastry’s texture resembles stacked leaves.

Sfinges,in Italy called Sfinci are made differently than “zeppole” which is the actual name for fried dough.

But since my Mother always called them Sfinges then that’s what we’re calling them.

Whatever you want to call them, Italian fried dough dipped in sugar is a great little treat for yourself and the kids.

There is an Italian pastry called “cannoncini”, which means “little cannons”.

These are a bit like cannoli, but filled with pastry cream instead of ricotta cheese.

Cannoli are part of Sicily’s ancient tradition of pastry and dessert making.

Sicilians buy their cannoli at the local bakery, but they are so delicious it is worth trying to make them at home, though you will require cannoli tubes to shape them.

This old variation of classic gnocchi (Italian dumplings) will surprise you with its plum center.

One of the variants from the original recipe of the cassateddi stuffed with ricotta, honey or sugar and spices, are the cassateddi filled with chickpeas and cocoa cream: the taste is typical and very agreeable to the palate.

Testa di Turco (Moors’ Head) is a Sicilian dessert prepared all over Sicily.

In some town it is made with baked cream-puff pastry in the form of a turban and covered with honey or else filled with ricotta or custard cream and colorfully decorated; in other places, it is made with baked puff-pasty shaped into square and it is spread with ricotta or custard cream.

Graffe Napoletane are special Neapolitan doughnuts which were once prepared only for Carnival.

Nevertheless they became part of the local tradition, especially for breakfast.